Cappadocia Yoga Eco

KRISHNAMURTI:”IF YOU LOSE YOUR CONNECTION WITH NATURE, YOU ALSO LOSE YOUR CONNECTION WITH HUMANITY".

Cappadocia is the country’s third most visited destination. Attracting an international audience of fans, travel magazines have labelled it as “must visit” while others called it one of the most surreal places in the world.

Besides being a tourist destination, Cappadocia also hosted many monks. The (remains of) ancient old monasteries bear witness to this. It's a center where your spiritual powers are revealed. Cappadocia is one of the only places where we will strengthen our communication with nature.


St. Symeon’s Hermitage (Paşabağı)

Paşabağı, a small monastic area near Zelve, features three pillar hermitages with monks’ cells and cave churches. The central hermitage, named after the resident monk, St. Symeon, is Cappadocia’s most famous stylite cell. Paşabağı (Turkish, “the general’s vineyard”) is often called “Monk’s Valley” on tour itineraries. Paşabağı is a remarkable cluster of stylite towers. The surreal valley offers a unique view of Cappadocia’s monastic practices and spectacular fairy chimneys.

One of the greatest spiritual leaders the world has known, Rumi also named Mevlana, once walked this soil. He lived in the nearby city of Konya. It might well be during his stay in Cappadocia that he wrote his famous poems, among other, about silence: “Keep silent, because the world of silence is a vast fullness.” Mevlana formed the centers of his teachings in the southwest of Cappadocia and Hacı Bektaş Veli in the northwest. In other words, the place that spread the philosophy of tolerance to the world was actually Cappadocia.

In addition, the images seen from space, built by Australian Architect Andrew Rogers on the Karadag hill, prove the importance of Cappadocia in the spiritual realm. Some of his work..


Siren

Siren by Andrew Rogers. Human head and body of a bird – in shamanistic beliefs they accompany humans in their journeys to the underworld and the heavens.

2009

Cappadocia

65m x100m (213’ x 328’)


Strength

‘Strength’, ‘Time & Space’ land art park, Cappadocia by Andrew Rogers. A double bodied lion derived from an image found in the Sultanhanı Township, Aksaray.

2009

Cappadocia

100m x 50m (328’ x 165’)

Total length of walls 830m (2,723 ft)


Grind

Andrew Rogers’ geoglyph ‘Grind’ is derived from an ancient millstone that belonged to the elders of the town of Goreme in Cappadocia.

Completed in 2009, it measures 100m x 100m.

Here you feel this sixty-million-year-old energy shaped by rain and wind over millions of years of lava and ashes erupted by Erciyes, Hasandağı and Göllüdağ. With millions of years of experience, they almost say to us, "Stay strong, you are a part of existence and destruction and you are unique". When you look around here, you can see the fairy chimneys that are still in the phase of formation or are in the phase of extinction. This reminds us of the return to essence, the line between death and life.


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FATMA NUR BASARAN